This Moroccan Lamb Shank Tagine originated in my father’s hometown of Marrakech and is packed with flavors of garlic, preserved lemon and lamb. You will love the sauce this dish provides served with a fresh baguette or over a bed of couscous.

a plate of Moroccan lamb shank tagine

If you love Moroccan recipes and homemade preserved lemons, look no further. This lamb shank tagine is the perfect recipe for you!

With the power of preserved lemons, fresh garlic and traditional Moroccan spices, lamb has never been better.

If you ever get the chance to try this tagine in its city of origin, Marrakech, you’ll see chefs in the Medina pulling tall clay pots (with a different shape than a classic tagine) out of the ground to serve you Tangia from.

That’s right, Tangia isn’t traditionally made in a tagine. It’s perfectly achievable in one, but there’s something truly special about witnessing the dish in it’s traditional glory.

If you’re interested in trying out more tagine recipes, I recommend this beef tagine, chicken tagine, and vegetable tagine.

ingredients to make lamb shank tagine

Ingredients

Here’s what you’ll need to make this tagine:

  • lamb shanks, cut into 3-4 inch cubes
  • garlic, minced
  • preserved lemon, diced with seeds removed
  • cumin
  • saffron (use twice the turmeric if you can’t find saffron
  • turmeric 
  • salt
  • olive oil 
  • ghee (use twice the olive oil if you can’t find ghee) 
  • water 
  • OPTIONAL: parsley, minced for garnish

See recipe card for exact quantities.

Instructions

Easy Additions

Once you’ve perfected this lamb shank tagine, you’ve got a wonderful sort of blank canvas that can be easily built off of.

Here are some easy additions you could toss into your tagine to mix things up. Keep in mind if you add new ingredients at the beginning of your cook time, they may get soft and mushy so I recommend adding any other vegetables in the last hour to keep their integrity.

full disclosure, the ideas I’m sharing below are actual Moroccan tajines I grew up eating that can be made with both lamb or beef. I’m hoping to share official recipes for these delicious combos at some point in the future 🙂

  • Green beans & tomato – truly a magical combination of veggies, the crunch of the green beans is great with the hit of acidity from the tomatoes
  • Artichoke hearts & peas – I’m pretty much always looking for places to incorporate artichoke hearts, so this variation has a really special place in my heart
  • Apricots or prunes & almonds – this one wasn’t my favorite as a kid but it has really grown on me as an adult. The sweet concentrated bite from the prunes is really spectacular with the savory lamb and crunchy almonds.
lamb shanks in a Moroccan sauce

What to Serve with Your Tajine

I recommend serving lamb tajine (or any tajine) with a collection of Moroccan salads. Not only is it the traditional pairing with for dish like this, it’s also a much needed bite of freshness for this tajine in particular.

  • Salads – This tomato salad is my personal favorite for this dish but you’ll also enjoy this carrot salad and lentil salad.
  • Mint tea – if you’re looking for the perfect drink to pair with your meal, look no further than a cup of Moroccan mint tea.
  • Fresh fruit – in Morocco fruit is widely accepted as a form of dessert, and is frequently served on large platters directly after the meal.
  • With bread or couscous – this tagine is traditionally enjoyed with freshly baked Moroccan bread (khobz), but it’s also delicious served over couscous (as pictured.)
a plate of Moroccan lamb shank tagine

Equipment

By now you’ve likely realized that the only special tool you will need to make Tangia is a clay pot like a tajine or tangia (the tall clay pots they make Tangia in in Marrakech).

I’m extremely lucky to have inherited all of my tajines from my dad but I know sourcing one directly from Morocco isn’t exactly easy for most of us.

That’s why I’ve compiled a short list of some of my favorite brands you can find domestically for you to shop from.

I really like this one by LeCruset because of how sturdy it is. This one by Emile Henry feels pretty close to the real thing you can find in Morocco as well.

a plate of Moroccan lamb shank tagine

Bismillah!

Salima written in cursive
Print
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a plate of Moroccan lamb shank tagine

Authentic Moroccan Lamb Shank Tagine (Tangia)

5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star 5 from 2 reviews
  • Author: Salima Benkhalti
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 4 hours
  • Total Time: 4 hours
  • Yield: 34 servings 1x
  • Category: Entree, Dinner, Lunch
  • Method: Tajine, Tagine
  • Cuisine: Moroccan, Mediterranean
  • Diet: Gluten Free

Description

This Moroccan Lamb Shank Tagine originated in my father’s hometown of Marrakech and is packed with flavors of garlic, preserved lemon and lamb. You will love the sauce this dish provides served with a fresh baguette or over a bed of couscous.


Ingredients

Units Scale
  • 2 lb lamb shank, cut into 3-4 inch cubes
  • 5 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 preserved lemon, diced with seeds removed
  • 3 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp saffron (use twice the turmeric if you can’t find saffron)
  • 2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tbsp ghee (use twice the olive oil if you can’t find ghee)
  • 1 tbsp water
  • Moroccan bread or couscous(optional)

Instructions

  1. Prep the oven to 275 degrees F / 135 degrees C. Start by preheating your oven to 275 degrees. Arrange the lamb in the base of the tagine. 
  2. Prep the marinade. In a small bowl combine the minced garlic, lemon, spices, oil, ghee and water. Mix well and pour the mixture over the lamb.
  3. Bake until for 2 hours, or until lamb is fully cooked. Cover the tagine and bake in the oven for 2 hours or until the lamb reaches an internal temperature of 145 degrees.
  4. Serve. Enjoy with Moroccan bread or your favorite kind of bread (to soak up the sauce) or over freshly cooked couscous with a sprinkle of minced parsley (optional).